Investigators say they found thousands of child-porn images in the home of a popular kids’ show, The Happy Scientist.

The science educator behind the popular children’s YouTube channel The Happy Scientist has been indicted on two federal child-pornography charges.

John Robert Krampf, 64, has been charged with knowingly receiving and possessing pornographic material “involving a minor who had not attained 12 years of age,” according to a September 16 indictment.

Investigators found “thousands upon thousands” of images and lewd videos of children while searching Krampf’s home in Kane County, Utah, Dixie State University Police Chief Blair Barfuss told the St. George News. Barfuss worked on the case in his capacity as an agent on the FBI’s Child Exploitation Task Force.

Barfuss said that based on the amount of footage and photos investigators discovered, Krampf “had apparently been doing this for a long time,” according to the St. George News.

The indictment was part of a sting operation that led to a dozen arrests in St. George, Utah, the St. George News reported.

Barfuss told Business Insider in an email that Krampf acknowledged “downloading multiple files of child abuse material” when interviewed by investigators. Barfuss said investigators “seized over twenty external hard drives from his residence” and sent all seized devices and files to the FBI’s Rocky Mountain Regional Computer Forensic Lab.

“We are currently following up on information obtained, and seeking input from the public, inquiring if Mr. Krampf may have been engaged in other illegal actions.”

Receipt of child pornography has a five-year mandatory minimum with a penalty of up to 20 years, and possession of child pornography has a maximum 20-year sentence, according to Melodie Rydalch, the public-information officer for the US attorney’s office in Utah.

Krampf’s initial court appearance is set for September 28, according to court documents.

Krampf began posting videos online in 2006

In 2006, he started creating videos to post online in addition to his real-life educational shows, according to Krampf’s website.

Krampf had millions of views on one of his YouTube videos, though the channel had only about 8,000 subscribers, according to The Daily Dot.

As of Thursday morning, Krampf’s YouTube channel was removed. Krampf’s videos were not available via the Internet Archive at press time.

Krampf also created a website to organize and share his YouTube videos. The website breaks down videos by topic, including life science, earth science, chemical science, and space science.

The website, thehappyscientist.com, offers more insight into Krampf’s personal life and upbringing.

Krampf had been educating children for decades, touring the US as ‘Mr. Electricity’
One page entitled “Who is Robert Krampf?” — which refers to him by his middle name — says a “monster movie” began his love for science education as a child.

“My lifelong love of science began when I was five years old,” Krampf wrote. “Like many five year olds, I was obsessed with dinosaurs.”

According to the website, Krampf previously worked with “famous paleontologists” and had a career in museum education, including working as an educator at the Memphis, Tennessee, Pink Palace Museum.

In 1987, Krampf began a traveling science-education program, touring the US for seven years. He traveled with his wife from Key West, Florida, to Seattle, according to his website, teaching “students and adults” about science.

A 1993 Los Angeles Times article highlighted his touring show, which was dubbed “Mr. Electricity.” His shows were recommended for children ages 5 and up, the LA Times reported. During his stint in Los Angeles, he would also “perform private shows for patients at Children’s Hospital of Orange County,” according to the LA Times.

In 1994, he took a position at the Museum of Science and History in Jacksonville, Florida. But Florida Power and Light (FPL) contracted Krampf in 1997 to travel around Florida educating students, the website said.

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